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Félix González-Torres
Untitled (USA Today), 1990.

Félix González-Torres

Untitled (USA Today), 1990.

(Source: marielfischer)

— 1 month ago with 18 notes
#felix gonzalez-torres  #art  #installation  #candy  #USA 
Félix González-Torres
Untitled (Throat), 1991.

Félix González-Torres

Untitled (Throat), 1991.

(via juju-be-art)

— 1 month ago with 24 notes
#felix gonzalez-torres  #throat  #candy  #art  #installation 
Félix González-Torres
Untitled (North), 1993.

Félix González-Torres

Untitled (North), 1993.

(Source: nock-nock-nock)

— 1 month ago with 18 notes
#felix gonzalez-torres  #art  #installation  #north  #light  #love 

Félix González-Torres.

Untitled (Placebo), 1991.

1200 pounds of silver-wrapped hard-candy. Public is invited to take the candies and help the installation disappear.

(Source: linemoire)

— 1 month ago with 47 notes
#felix gonzalez-torres  #placebo  #candy  #art  #instalation  #love  #death 

Félix González-Torres,

Untitled (Portrait of Ross in L.A.), 1991.

a-cathartic-process:

"Felix Gonzalez-Torres ‘Untitled’ (Portrait of Ross)is an allegorical representation of the artist’s partner, Ross Laycock, who died of an AIDS-related illness in 1991. The installation is comprised of 175 pounds of candy, corresponding to Ross’s ideal body weight. Viewers are encouraged to take a piece of candy, and the diminishing amount parallels Ross’s weight loss and suffering prior to his death. Gonzalez-Torres stipulated that the pile should be continuously replenished, thus metaphorically granting perpetual life."

(Source: bonnibella.com)

— 1 month ago with 445 notes
#felix gonzalez-torres  #love  #candy  #instalation  #art  #time  #death 
Félix González-Torres 
Untitled (Golden), 1995.

Félix González-Torres

Untitled (Golden), 1995.

(Source: nock-nock-nock)

— 1 month ago with 38 notes
#felix gonzalez-torres  #golden  #love  #art  #instalation  #threshold 
Félix González-Torres.
Untitled (Golden), 1995.

Félix González-Torres.

Untitled (Golden), 1995.

(Source: thissideofkendy)

— 1 month ago with 77 notes
#felix gonzalez-torres  #golden  #instalation  #art  #threshold 
Félix González-Torres
Lovers, 1988.

Félix González-Torres

Lovers, 1988.

(Source: goldgoldgoldd)

— 1 month ago with 80 notes
#felix gonzalez-torres  #love  #time  #sincronize 
Felix Gonzalez-Torres 
Untitled (Perfect Lovers), 1987-1990  Wall clocks, 35.6 x 71.2 x 7 cm overall
Gonzales-Torres’s iconic work “Untitled” (Perfect Lovers) is a pair of identically round, ready-made wall clocks, with their batteries synchronized to the same time upon installation. Although their synchronous movement seems interminable, the clocks eventually fall out of sync due to the mechanical glitches, and one clock ultimately expires before the other. Considering the artist’s relationship with his lifelong partner, Ross, who battled with AIDS for most of the 8 years they were together, every minute and second of time resonates with exceptional poignancy. At the same time, the ordinariness of the clocks does not readily reveal the subtle references contained within. The paired clocks not only symbolize the couple’s love, life and death, but their identical shapes also allude to homosexuality, expressing the artist’s subtle yet powerful statement against social prejudice.

Felix Gonzalez-Torres

Untitled (Perfect Lovers), 1987-1990 
Wall clocks, 35.6 x 71.2 x 7 cm overall

Gonzales-Torres’s iconic work “Untitled” (Perfect Lovers) is a pair of identically round, ready-made wall clocks, with their batteries synchronized to the same time upon installation. Although their synchronous movement seems interminable, the clocks eventually fall out of sync due to the mechanical glitches, and one clock ultimately expires before the other. Considering the artist’s relationship with his lifelong partner, Ross, who battled with AIDS for most of the 8 years they were together, every minute and second of time resonates with exceptional poignancy. At the same time, the ordinariness of the clocks does not readily reveal the subtle references contained within. The paired clocks not only symbolize the couple’s love, life and death, but their identical shapes also allude to homosexuality, expressing the artist’s subtle yet powerful statement against social prejudice.

(via museumuesum)

— 1 month ago with 8260 notes
#felix gonzalez-torres  #love  #time  #sincronia